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My travels to UAE and Oman in 2015 – part 3

Today I was going to go to the east coast of the UAE for some scuba diving activities.

I was going to the resort of Fujairah.

The resort of Fujairah on the east coast of the UAE.

The resort of Fujairah on the east coast of the UAE.

Fujairah is approximately two hours drive from Dubai and is popular with tourists who want to get away from citylife.

The beach is very quiet here.

The beach is very quiet here.

Many watersport activities can be conducted from here.

Me posing in the resort of Fujairah.

Me posing in the resort of Fujairah.

Diving on the east coast of the UAE is mainly reefs and a few small wrecks.

This was to be a short introduction to scuba diving before crossing the border at Dibba and into Oman for some boat diving along the Oman coastline of the Musandam peninsula.

The sea temperature in Fujairah was a staggering 29 degrees Celsius. In addition, the sea had a lot of planktons and thus the visability was poor. The sea was very green underwater and photography was therefore poor.

A Parrotfish sighted off a small wreck.

A Parrotfish sighted off a small wreck.

I saw a seahorse of approximately 20cms in size. A quite rare encounter for scuba divers.

A rather large seahorse.

A rather large seahorse.

After my two dives in Fujairah, I was going to cross the border at Dibba and into Oman.

The small border town of Dibba in Oman.

The small border town of Dibba in Oman.

The Musandam peninsula is the most northerly province of Oman and marks the entrance to the Arabian Gulf via the Straits of Hormuz.

The port in Dibba was where I was going to get onto our converted dhow boat.

Traditional dhows converted for tourism.

Traditional dhows converted for tourism.

Me in the port of Dibba.

Me in the port of Dibba.

Diving in the Musandam peninsula is mostly drift diving and therefore not recommended for novice divers.

Relaxing on the sundeck before my dives.

Relaxing on the sundeck before my dives.

The Musandam coastline itself is carved into countless fjords, bays and islands.

The coastline of the The Musandam peninsula.

The coastline of the Musandam peninsula.

Me posing for the sexy gals on the boat.

Me posing for the sexy gals on the boat.

Marine life expected to be seen off Omani waters are five species of turtles, Eagle Rays and Devil Rays, and reef sharks. Occassionly Whale Sharks can be seen during the summer months. The colourful corals attracts tropical species such as Parrotfish, Batfish and Lion fish.

Arriving at one of the dive sites off the Oman coastline.

Arriving at one of the dive sites off the Oman coastline.

Omani water is plankton rich and therefore water visibility is reduced from that of other diving destinations.

Plenty of marine life.

Plenty of marine life.

A Moray Eel laying await for an ambush.

A Moray Eel laying await for an ambush.

A another Moray Eel spotted.

Another Moray Eel spotted.

I saw Nemo!

I saw Nemo!

I saw a turtle.

I saw a turtle.

I saw a second turtle.

I saw a second turtle.

A two metre Eagle Ray.

A two metre Eagle Ray.

After two days of diving from the dhow we head back to Dibba and eventually back to Dubai.

The sun sets as we head back to Dibba.

The sun sets as we head back to Dibba.

Arriving back in Dubai it was time to buy some tacky souvenirs to annoy people back home.

I brought a naff Shake my Sheikh salt and pepper shakers.

Shake my Sheikh salt and pepper shakers.

Pride of place. Photo: Copyright KW 2015.

This was going to be given to my boss in the hope that I will get some extra overtime shifts at work (as well as a promotion!)

– The end –

For more information on Oman please visit:

www.omantourism.gov.om


My travels to UAE and Oman in 2015 – part 1

I am back from my six days visit to the United Arab Emirates (UAE). I was able to do some sightseeing and cross over the border to Oman for scuba diving.

In summary, I spent two full days in Oman and three full days in the UAE sightseeing and shopping.

It was hot at this time of the year. The temperature was 39 degrees Celsius whilst the sea temperature was 29 degrees Celsius.

My hotel was in the old part of Dubai known as Deira and was near to Dubai Creek.

Dubai itself is a city famous for its modern architecture and luxury shopping malls. The city has expanded at an enormous rate over the last few decades and the population now stands at 2.5 million (mostly expats and immigrants). In the 1950s the population was 20,000 people. With the discovery of oil, the city rapidly expanded and it wealth has led to ultramodern projects such as the Palm Jumeirah artificial archipelago project. Many of the construction projects in Dubai are now on hold due the 2008 banking crisies and the current decline in oil prices.

When I arrived, my first sightseeing was to Dubai Marina. This is a residential district of Dubai where many westerners expats live.

Dubai Marina is a residential district.

Dubai Marina is a residential district.

Many of the skyscapers here are residential blocks.

The skyscrapers of Dubai Marina.

The skyscrapers of Dubai Marina.

Having known many expats living here over the years, a lot of these residential towers were built by dubious developers and many expats have lost their investments to these crooks. That is typical of how things are done in Dubai. So becareful if you are considering investing here.

The Torch Tower had a twenty storey fire last February. At the time of construction I had spoken to many expats who purchased off plan into this tower and many expressed concerns about the poor construction of the tower including lack of fire protection coatings. Their concerns proven to be correct.

Me posing next to the residential skyscrapers.

Me posing next to the residential skyscrapers.

All over the marina, new towers are still being built.

Construction is still ongoing.

Construction is still ongoing.

I took a small RIB boat from the Marina to visit the artificial archipelagos.

Dubai Marina can accommodate 120,000 people.

Dubai Marina can accommodate 120,000 people.

Taking the boat out, I saw the Palm Jumeirah artificial archipelago project and also the Burj Al Arab hotel. The hotel was opened in 1999 and it is a symbol of modern Dubai.

The Burj Al Arab hotel is the world's only 7 star hotel.

The Burj Al Arab hotel is the world’s only 7 star hotel.

This hotel is the world’s only 7 star hotel. Living on my £145 per month army pension, I was not able to afford to stay here for my holiday.

This is the fourth tallest hotel in the world.

This is the fourth tallest hotel in the world.

With gold plated toilets and personal butlers to chauffeur-driven Rolls-Royce services, this hotel has been repeatedly voted the world’s most luxurious hotel.

The distinctive sail-shaped silhouette of Burj Al Arab hotel.

The distinctive sail-shaped silhouette of Burj Al Arab hotel.

From the marina, I had to cross the famous Sheikh Zayed Road to get to the metro station.

The traffic on Sheikh Zayed Road.

The traffic on Sheikh Zayed Road.

I took the metro back to the old city.

The metro with the Burj Khalifa tower in the background.

The metro with the Burj Khalifa tower in the background.

Whilst on the metro, I passed the Burj Khalifa tower. This is the tallest tower in the world, standing at 829.8 m (2,722 ft) tall. The building gained the official title of “Tallest Building in the World” at its opening on January 4th, 2010.

The world's tallest building.

The world’s tallest building.

Arriving in the old city of Dubai, I first went to see the Creek.

The old port of Dubai Creek.

The old port of Dubai Creek.

Dubai Creek is the old part of the city and was originlly a small port for numberous dhows that traded with East Africa and India. It is still used for trade using the traditional dhows.

Me posing next to one of the dhows.

Me posing next to one of the dhows.

A short walk later, I came to the Al Fahidi fort.

The fort is now a museum.

The fort is now a museum.

The fort was built in 1787 and is the oldest existing building in Dubai. It is now a museum and is 3 AED (£0.60) to get in.

The courtyard of Al Fahidi Fort.

The courtyard of Al Fahidi fort.

After my sightseeing, I went to do some late night shopping.

The Dubai Mall is the world’s largest shopping mall based on total area. Opened in 2009, it has over 1200 stores.

The shopping mall's interior.

The shopping mall’s interior.

In March this year, more than a hundred foreign labourers protested in front of Dubai Mall due to overtime wages not being paid. Despite all the ultraluxury developments in Dubai, there is a lot of poor pay within the city.

The fashion avenue of the mall.

The fashion avenue of the mall.

The Mall comes with a interior aquarium so that shoppers can stare at the fish whilst shopping.

Window shopping was never like this!

Window shopping was never like this!

The Mall of the Emirates has over 700 stores and a ski slope! The Middle East’s first indoor ski resort and snow park.

This shopping mall has a ski slope!

This shopping mall has a ski slope!

After buying my sexy gal a sexy skirt and several dresses, I headed back to my faulty air conditioning hotel room.

The next day I was going to visit Al Ain, the UNESCO World Heritage Site.

To be continued….

For more information about the UAE and Dubai please visit:

www.uaetourism.ae


My travels to Turkey in 2015 – part 3

Today I was going to visit Dalyan and the river delta.

The river town of Dalyan.

The river town of Dalyan.

At the town of Dalyan, traditional turkish boats take tourists along the river delta to the various attractions for 35 TL (approx. £8.75). Along the way I got to see the rock tombs, the mudbaths and Iztuzu beach also known as Turtle beach as well as Kaunos ruins.

A traditional fishing boat on the river.

A traditional fishing boat on the river.

The small boat was packed with over thirty tourists and was very crowded. Most of them were inconsiderately smoking in such a small confined space!

The Lycian tock tombs at Dalyan.

The Lycian rock tombs at Dalyan.

On the way to Iztuzu beach, we passed the Lycian Tombs.

Crusing past the rock tombs.

Crusing past the rock tombs.

After a few kilometres, the boat arrives at the back of Iztuzu beach.

The boat jetty at the rear of the beach.

The boat jetty at the rear of the beach.

Iztuzu beach is a reserve and turtles lay their eggs there, it is lovely and unspoilt.

Many daytrippers boats are here.

Many daytrippers boats are here.

Turtles can be seen in the waters around the boats.

The beach is 7kms long.

The beach is 7kms long.

The beach is very busy with daytrippers from all of the nearby resorts.

Walking along the beach.

Walking along the beach.

You can walk the 7km along the beach from one end to the other, but take plenty of water as there are only two beach cafes on the beach and very little shade.

I walked to the very end of the beach.

I walked to the very end of the beach.

The beach is closed to the public at nighttime due to turtles activities.

Tracks of a turtle running up a sand dune.

Tracks of a turtle running up a sand dune.

Beach wardens protect the nests.

A protected turtle nest.

A protected turtle nest.

After spending a few hours on the beach we headed to the mudbaths for a quick bath in the mud.

A quick bath to rejuvenate my skin.

A quick bath to rejuvenate my skin.

The mudbaths are said to have mineral properties to rejuvenate the skin.

Our last stop on the boat trip was to visit the Kaunos ruins. Kaunos was an ancient and important seaport. It has both Greek and Roman influence. The ruins date back to the 10th century BC.

Kaunos was a important seaport.

Kaunos was a important seaport.

Due to the silting of the bay of Dalyan, the ruins of Kaunos are now located about 8kms from the coast.

The theater has seating for 5000 people.

The theatre has seating for 5000 people.

The theatre is still used for performances.

The Heraklion fortress above the ruin city.

The Heraklion fortress above the ruin city.

A little lake forms what used to be the main seaport.

The old seaport.

The old seaport.

The city was abandoned in the 15th century AD following a malaria outbreak.

A Grecko sits on the wall.

A grecko sits on the wall.

On my return back to my appartment I was horrified to see a Praying Mantis (Mantis religiosa) on my balcony.

A Prayer Mantis on my balcony.

A Prayer Mantis on my balcony.

Fearing for my life, I had to run away! Something that I am well used to from my army days.

A close up of the Mantis.

A close up of the Mantis.

On my last day of my holiday I was going into the mountains to Saklikent Gorge. It is 50kms from Fethiye. The gorge is 20kms in length and 300 metres high.

Saklikent Gorge is over 20kms long.

Saklikent Gorge is over 20kms long.

The gorge is one of the longest in the world and I was going to walk several kilometres inland. With the water running down the gorge, the walk requires wading through the water up to waist height or in my case (as I am only 30 cms tall) being totally submerged.

A wooden walkway at the start of the gorge

A wooden walkway at the start of the gorge

A wooden walkway at the start of the gorge is the entry point into the gorge. After a few hundred metres, the walkway ends at a cafe. From here onwards, tourists must wade through the water. Safety ropes are in place for handholds. Tourists can only wade through the gorge in the summer months for safety reasons.

It is one of the longest gorges in the world.

It is one of the longest gorges in the world.

Finally, I went white water tubing down the river. After a knackering day at the gorge I headed back to the apartment where I spent my last night to a night of love with a sexy gal (I had to pay her fifty Euros). Then it was back to work the following Monday *sniffs*.

– The end –

For more information about Turkey please visit:

www.goturkey.com


Scotland long distance walks: West Highland Way – part 3

Today was day 3 and I was going to trek from Rowardennan to Crianlarich, a distance of 32 kms (20 miles).

It began to rain during the early hours.

A footbridge on the forest path.

A footbridge on the forest path.

This stretch is mostly forestry track following the eastern shore of Loch Lomond with occasional diversions onto a rocky path with crags and boulders.

Soon I arrived at Inversnaid – a village on the east bank of Loch Lomond, near the north end of the loch. It has a pier and a hotel. A small passenger ferry runs from Inversnaid to Inveruglas on the opposite shore of the loch.

The harbour at Inversnaid.

The harbour at Inversnaid.

The village became notable in 2010, when Inversnaid primary school was deemed to cost £54,000 per pupil, making it the most expensive primary school in the UK on a per capita basis.

The next section of the walk is by far the roughest section of the Way. The path is very rough going through the forest with many up and downs as one climbs over boulders, rocks and fallen trees.

About 1km north of Inversnaid is Rob Roy’s Cave. This is not a cave but a pile of rocks on top of each other forming a crevice. This was one of the bandit’s hideouts.

Eventually the Way emerges on an open gravel shore bay.

This could had been a nice picnic stop if it wasn't raining.

This could had been a nice picnic stop if it wasn’t raining.

By now it was raining very heavy now and my cotton fur was getting very soggy.

I was getting very wet!

I was getting very wet!

I put the stove on for a quick coffee whilst sheltering under a tree.

I was hoping for the rain to stop.

I was hoping for the rain to stop.

Carrying on in the rain, the Way leaves Loch Lomond. Across the loch was the village of Ardlui where a ferry can be taken during the summer months.

The last sight of Loch Lomond.

The last sight of Loch Lomond.

The path follow an old pathway towards Inverarnan. Here is the popular stopping point the Drovers’ Inn. It is a favourite with walkers with its range of good value meals and selection of beers and whiskies. It is well worth a visit, if only to see the collection of stuffed animals and birds.

Leaving Inveraran, the path starts a steady ascent out of the Loch Lomond basin.

The path follows the old military road.

The path follows the old military road.

The path follows the river Falloch through a succession of gorges, rocky rapids, short cascades, cauldrons and wide dark peaty pools with short stretches of smooth water in between.

The way follows the river Falloch.

The way follows the river Falloch.

The path follows the river.

The Falls of Falloch.

The Falls of Falloch.

About two kilometres after the falls is the farm of Derrydarroch.

Derrydarroch farm is a working farm.

Derrydarroch farm is a working farm.

Here at the farm the Way crosses the river at a bridge.

An old shed at Derrydarroch Farm.

An old shed at Derrydarroch Farm.

The Way passes under a railway and road by a “sheep creep”.

This tunnel was very low.

This tunnel was very low.

The weather was getting worst with the rain.

The weather was getting worst.

The weather was getting worst.

The path takes another old military road going uphill towards a conifer plantation.

The way follows an old military road.

The way follows an old military road.

At the fence of the forest, the path spilts into two. The Way leads to the left whilst a path to the right leads to the village of Crianlarich. This is the half way point of the West Highland Way.

It was raining very heavy now and it was 7pm.

It was getting dark and raining heavy.

It was getting dark and raining heavy.

I was soaking so I put up my tent for the night in the forest.

To be continued….

For more information on the West Highlands Way please visit:

www.west-highland-way.co.uk


Scotland long distance walks: West Highland Way – part 2

Today I was going to walk from Drymen to Rowardennan on the east coast of Loch Lomond. This stage was to be 25 kms (15 miles).

I spent the night camping in the Queen Elizabeth Forest Park. The Queen Elizabeth Forest Park was first designated as a Forest Park by the Forestry Commission in 1953 to mark the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.

The clearing in the forest where I spent the night.

The clearing in the forest where I spent the night.

I watch the sunrise.

I watch the sunrise over the trees.

I watch the sunrise over the trees.

The forest is a conifer plantation and is currently undergoing harvesting.

This forest is currently undergoing harvesting.

This forest is currently undergoing harvesting.

The park is managed by the Forestry Commission.

Stack of harvest logs.

Stack of harvest logs.

After walking a mile or two through the forest tracks, I stopped in a clearing for breakfast. From the clearing I could see Conic Hill in the distance.

Me at my breakfast view point.

Me at my breakfast view point.

After breakfast, I return back to the track heading towards Conic Hill.

The signpost marking the way.

The signpost marking the way.

Through a clearing I see my first view of Loch Lomond.

My first view of Loch Lomond.

My first view of Loch Lomond.

The path goes along the edge of two fields before crossing the Burn of Mar and emerging onto open moorland heading up the ridge to the summit

The path up to Conic Hill.

The path up to Conic Hill.

It was a steep climb to the ridge line.

The steps up to Conic Hill ridge.

The steps up to Conic Hill ridge.

The Way follows a natural ledge just below the summit. The Way does not go to Conic Hill summit but to reach the summit, take the obvious path to the left of the Way path for the short, steep climb to the top.

The Way follows the ridge line.

The Way follows the ridge line.

Looking towards Loch Lomond, I could see the line of islands following the Highland boundary fault across Loch Lomond.

It was windy up here.

It was windy up here.

I then begin the decent towards Loch Lomond.

The steps going downwards.

The steps going downwards.

The forest path leads to the car park at Balmaha.

Balmaha is a hamlet on the eastern shore of Loch Lomond.

The harbour and boat yard on Loch Lomond at Balmaha.

The harbour and boat yard on Loch Lomond at Balmaha.

Balmaha is a popular tourist destination for day trippers from Glasgow as well a trekkers on the West Highland Way.

Balmaha is a popular tourist destination.

Balmaha is a popular tourist destination.

Boat trips leave from Balmaha for the villages of Balloch and Luss as well as nearby Inchcailloch Island.

The harbour had many boats.

The harbour had many boats.

I stopped here for a coffee.

I stopped here for a coffee.

I stopped here for a coffee.

The view across Loch Lomond was great.

Looking across to Inchcailloch Island.

Looking across to Inchcailloch Island.

I set off on my walk again following the path to the top of a hill, known as Craigie Fort.

Looking back onto Balmaha.

Looking back onto Balmaha.

The path then follows the east shore of Loch Lomond towards Arrochymore Point and then ontowards Milarrochy Bay, a popular picnic and boat launching spot.

The path follows the shore.

The path follows the shore.

It was a sunny day when I trekking here despite being October. I could be happy wearing my shorts.

It was quiet at this time of the year.

It was quiet at this time of the year.

I found a caterpillar on my boots.

This little creepy was on my boots.

This little creepy was on my boots.

The Way continues along the shore between and up a steep stony path into Ross Wood.

The path took me into woods again.

The path took me into woods again.

The mushrooms in this wood were very colourful….

The mushrooms here were colourful.

The mushrooms here were colourful.

….and very big!

This mushroom was huge!

This mushroom was huge!

This mushroom was about 20-25 cms across.

Comparing the size of the mushroom with my foot.

Comparing the size of the mushroom with my foot.

The Way continues along the shoreline to meet the road just south of Rowardennan.

The jetty at Rowardennan.

The jetty at Rowardennan.

Rowardennan is also the start point for the ascent of Ben Lomond, Scotland’s most climbed mountain. At 974 metres (3195 feet), it is the most southerly Munro (a name given to mountains over 3000 feet, approximately 914m).

That night I set camp in the woods. As I did so – five Red Deers crept near my campsite.

These Red Deers were close to my campsite.

These Red Deers were close to my campsite.

I was knackered after two days of hard trekking but the worst was yet to come.

To be continued….

For more information on the West Highlands Way please visit:

www.west-highland-way.co.uk


My trip to Dubrovnik, Croatia in 2013 – part 2

Following my arrest upon my arrival, I set about to enjoy the rest of my two week holiday in Dubrovnik.

Dubrovnik is on the coast of Croatia on the Adriatic Sea. It is a popular tourist destination on the coast of Croatia and is popular with day trippers from docking cruise ships. In 1979 the walled city of Dubrovnik joined the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.

My first attraction that I was going to visit was the City Walls. It cost 90 Kuna (almost £12) to walk the walls.

The City Walls walk is a good introduction to Dubrovnik as you will have the chance to see some of the city’s monuments.

The length of the walls walk is 2km, but with my active military training I was fit enough to do this walk. It is best to do this walk either early morning or late afternoon to avoid the midday sun.

Many tourists here fresh off the cruise ships.

Many tourists here fresh off the cruise ships.

This is a very popular tourist attraction and is very busy. The authorities make people walk anti-clockwise to avoid people congestion.

Onofrio's Great Fountain near the Pile Gate.

Onofrio’s Great Fountain near the Pile Gate.

Onofrio’s Great and Small Fountains were built by Neapolitan architect Onofrio della Cava as part of Dubrovnik’s water supply system.

Onofrio’s Great Fountain is located at the very entrance to Dubrovnik (by the Pile Gate), while the Small Fountain stands at the eastern end of the city.

The fortifications of Dubrovnik.

The fortifications of Dubrovnik.

The walls are considered to be amongst the great fortification systems of the Middle Ages.

Looking across to St. Lawrence Fortress.

Looking across to St. Lawrence Fortress.

Heading towards the seaward side of the City walls, you will see St. Lawrence Fortress which emerges from the cliff 37m high.

I got to see lots from high up on the walls.

I got to see lots from high up on the walls.

The walk is very hard going in the heat so bring plenty of drinks.

Almost half way.

Almost half way.

It is a very tiring walk as there is little shade from the sun.

The fortifications of the old town.

The fortifications of the old town.

The walls are reinforced by three circular and fourteen quadrangular towers, five bastions (bulwarks), two angular fortifications and the large St. John’s Fortress.

The red top roofs of the old town.

The red top roofs of the old town.

The Croatian War of Independence was fought from 1991 to 1995 between Croat forces loyal to the government of Croatia which had declared independence from the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and the Serb controlled Yugoslav People’s Army (JNA) and local Serb forces, with the JNA ending its combat operations in Croatia by 1992. In Croatia, the war is primarily referred to as the Homeland War.

Dubrovnik became under seige from Serb forces in October 1991 and the first bombardment of Dubrovnik culminated on 6th December of that year. The seige lasted for nine months of which many houses within the old town became damaged or destroyed. 88 civilians were killed. Nowadays, the old town had been rebuilt and the roof tops of the house are new.

Laundry underwear on the city walls walk.

Laundry underwear on the city walls walk.

Walking the length of walls, one get to see inside people back gardens! Hanging laundry is everywhere.

Looking into the harbour.

Looking into the harbour.

Going further you will reach St John’s Fortress standing proudly at the entrance to the Old Town Harbour.

Dubrovnik harbour.

Dubrovnik harbour.

The harbour is full of tourists boat tours.

This cannon overlooks the harbour.

This cannon overlooks the harbour.

The harbour is now popular with sea-front cafes and ice cream shops.

Looking over the houses of the old town.

Looking over the houses of the old town.

As a result of the post 1991-95 war reconstruction, many of the roof tops in the old town are new and very brightly red in colour.

Finally we reach the northernmost point of the walls – Minčeta Tower.

Near the end of my walk is Minčeta Tower.

Near the end of my walk is Minčeta Tower.

The tower was near the end of the walk.

I was near the end of my 2km walls walk.

I was near the end of my 2km walls walk.

It took me two hours to do the walk with all the sights and I have short legs!

I was exhausted at the end of my walk, so I went down to the main street of the old town – the Stradun. The limestone-paved pedestrian street runs some 300 metres through the Old Town.

I got myself a ice cream for 10 Kuna (about £1.20). In Dubrovnik, ice cream comes on one size – VERY BIG! They fill the cone with as much ice cream as possible before gravity becomes the issue.

To be continued….

For more information about Croatia please visit:

http://www.croatia.hr


My daytrip to Malmö, Sweden in 2013

Today I was going to cross the Øresund Bridge by train and into Sweden to the city of Malmö.

The Øresund Bridge links Denmark to Sweden and was opened in 2000. It is a dual railway/road bridge and is almost 5 miles in length with a 2.5 mile tunnel preceding the bridge from the Danish side. It only cost 78 DKK (approx. 9 Euros) to cross the bridge by train.

The journey time from Copenhagen to Malmö is approximately half an hour.

My day trip to Sweden was to visit the city of Malmö. This is the third largest city in Sweden and the most southernmost city in Sweden.

Me posing next to Malmö City Hall.

Me posing next to Malmö City Hall.

In recent years, Malmö has become known for it rape crime wave and has earnt the reputation of the rape capital of Europe. A sad reflection on the failings of modern politicians. Putting this aside, Malmö centre has a number of interesting historic buildings and a castle from a time when this part of Sweden was part of Denmark.

The Swedish flags outside the City Hall.

The Swedish flags outside the City Hall.

My visit to Malmö was to start in the city centre in the square.

The city centre had many historic buildings.

The city centre had many historic buildings.

Near the square is St Petri (The Church of Saint Peter). It is a Gothic style in which construction started in 1319. It has a 105 metre tall tower.

The Church of Saint Peter is a Gothic style church.

The Church of Saint Peter is a Gothic style church.

After seeing the church, I was off to Willys supermarket to get my sandwiches. I like Willys.

Willys was very tasty food.

Willys was very tasty food.

Malmö is the host for the 2013 Eurovision Song Contest. This is the yearly contest to find Europe’s worst song and then promote the song in as a song of European unity. The contest is a mismatch of awful singers who had past their time many years ago (or in some cases decades ago).

Malmö is the host for 2013 Eurovision Song Contest.

Malmö is the host for 2013 Eurovision Song Contest.

I was walking around the historic centre of Malmö.

The old buildings of Malmö.

The old buildings of Malmö.

Near the centre of Malmö is the castle.

Malmö Castle is a fortress located in Malmö built in the 1530s.

Malmö Castle is a fortress located in Malmö built in the 1530s.

The castle is now a museum.

This castle replaced the older castle of 1434 by King Eric of Pomerania.

This castle replaced the older castle of 1434 by King Eric of Pomerania.

The castle is near the city park.

This charming windmill is in the park near the castle.

This charming windmill is in the park near the castle.

It was getting late on the afternoon. I was wearing my newly knitted daisy wooly hat.

Me posing next to the windmill.

Me posing next to the windmill.

I was off to the harbour for the sunset.

A Viking boat in the harbour.

A Viking boat in the harbour.

The harbour is a major port for Scandinavian shipping.

The sunset over the lighthouse.

The sunset over the lighthouse.

After visiting the harbour, I watched the sunset over the harbour with the Turning Torso tower in the background. The Turning Torso is the tallest skyscraper in Sweden.

The sunset over the harbour with the Turning Torso in the background.

The sunset over the harbour with the Turning Torso in the background.

For more information about Malmö please visit:

http://www.malmo.se/english