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My travels to UAE and Oman in 2015 – part 3

Today I was going to go to the east coast of the UAE for some scuba diving activities.

I was going to the resort of Fujairah.

The resort of Fujairah on the east coast of the UAE.

The resort of Fujairah on the east coast of the UAE.

Fujairah is approximately two hours drive from Dubai and is popular with tourists who want to get away from citylife.

The beach is very quiet here.

The beach is very quiet here.

Many watersport activities can be conducted from here.

Me posing in the resort of Fujairah.

Me posing in the resort of Fujairah.

Diving on the east coast of the UAE is mainly reefs and a few small wrecks.

This was to be a short introduction to scuba diving before crossing the border at Dibba and into Oman for some boat diving along the Oman coastline of the Musandam peninsula.

The sea temperature in Fujairah was a staggering 29 degrees Celsius. In addition, the sea had a lot of planktons and thus the visability was poor. The sea was very green underwater and photography was therefore poor.

A Parrotfish sighted off a small wreck.

A Parrotfish sighted off a small wreck.

I saw a seahorse of approximately 20cms in size. A quite rare encounter for scuba divers.

A rather large seahorse.

A rather large seahorse.

After my two dives in Fujairah, I was going to cross the border at Dibba and into Oman.

The small border town of Dibba in Oman.

The small border town of Dibba in Oman.

The Musandam peninsula is the most northerly province of Oman and marks the entrance to the Arabian Gulf via the Straits of Hormuz.

The port in Dibba was where I was going to get onto our converted dhow boat.

Traditional dhows converted for tourism.

Traditional dhows converted for tourism.

Me in the port of Dibba.

Me in the port of Dibba.

Diving in the Musandam peninsula is mostly drift diving and therefore not recommended for novice divers.

Relaxing on the sundeck before my dives.

Relaxing on the sundeck before my dives.

The Musandam coastline itself is carved into countless fjords, bays and islands.

The coastline of the The Musandam peninsula.

The coastline of the Musandam peninsula.

Me posing for the sexy gals on the boat.

Me posing for the sexy gals on the boat.

Marine life expected to be seen off Omani waters are five species of turtles, Eagle Rays and Devil Rays, and reef sharks. Occassionly Whale Sharks can be seen during the summer months. The colourful corals attracts tropical species such as Parrotfish, Batfish and Lion fish.

Arriving at one of the dive sites off the Oman coastline.

Arriving at one of the dive sites off the Oman coastline.

Omani water is plankton rich and therefore water visibility is reduced from that of other diving destinations.

Plenty of marine life.

Plenty of marine life.

A Moray Eel laying await for an ambush.

A Moray Eel laying await for an ambush.

A another Moray Eel spotted.

Another Moray Eel spotted.

I saw Nemo!

I saw Nemo!

I saw a turtle.

I saw a turtle.

I saw a second turtle.

I saw a second turtle.

A two metre Eagle Ray.

A two metre Eagle Ray.

After two days of diving from the dhow we head back to Dibba and eventually back to Dubai.

The sun sets as we head back to Dibba.

The sun sets as we head back to Dibba.

Arriving back in Dubai it was time to buy some tacky souvenirs to annoy people back home.

I brought a naff Shake my Sheikh salt and pepper shakers.

Shake my Sheikh salt and pepper shakers.

Pride of place. Photo: Copyright KW 2015.

This was going to be given to my boss in the hope that I will get some extra overtime shifts at work (as well as a promotion!)

– The end –

For more information on Oman please visit:

www.omantourism.gov.om

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My travels to Turkey in 2015 – part 3

Today I was going to visit Dalyan and the river delta.

The river town of Dalyan.

The river town of Dalyan.

At the town of Dalyan, traditional turkish boats take tourists along the river delta to the various attractions for 35 TL (approx. £8.75). Along the way I got to see the rock tombs, the mudbaths and Iztuzu beach also known as Turtle beach as well as Kaunos ruins.

A traditional fishing boat on the river.

A traditional fishing boat on the river.

The small boat was packed with over thirty tourists and was very crowded. Most of them were inconsiderately smoking in such a small confined space!

The Lycian tock tombs at Dalyan.

The Lycian rock tombs at Dalyan.

On the way to Iztuzu beach, we passed the Lycian Tombs.

Crusing past the rock tombs.

Crusing past the rock tombs.

After a few kilometres, the boat arrives at the back of Iztuzu beach.

The boat jetty at the rear of the beach.

The boat jetty at the rear of the beach.

Iztuzu beach is a reserve and turtles lay their eggs there, it is lovely and unspoilt.

Many daytrippers boats are here.

Many daytrippers boats are here.

Turtles can be seen in the waters around the boats.

The beach is 7kms long.

The beach is 7kms long.

The beach is very busy with daytrippers from all of the nearby resorts.

Walking along the beach.

Walking along the beach.

You can walk the 7km along the beach from one end to the other, but take plenty of water as there are only two beach cafes on the beach and very little shade.

I walked to the very end of the beach.

I walked to the very end of the beach.

The beach is closed to the public at nighttime due to turtles activities.

Tracks of a turtle running up a sand dune.

Tracks of a turtle running up a sand dune.

Beach wardens protect the nests.

A protected turtle nest.

A protected turtle nest.

After spending a few hours on the beach we headed to the mudbaths for a quick bath in the mud.

A quick bath to rejuvenate my skin.

A quick bath to rejuvenate my skin.

The mudbaths are said to have mineral properties to rejuvenate the skin.

Our last stop on the boat trip was to visit the Kaunos ruins. Kaunos was an ancient and important seaport. It has both Greek and Roman influence. The ruins date back to the 10th century BC.

Kaunos was a important seaport.

Kaunos was a important seaport.

Due to the silting of the bay of Dalyan, the ruins of Kaunos are now located about 8kms from the coast.

The theater has seating for 5000 people.

The theatre has seating for 5000 people.

The theatre is still used for performances.

The Heraklion fortress above the ruin city.

The Heraklion fortress above the ruin city.

A little lake forms what used to be the main seaport.

The old seaport.

The old seaport.

The city was abandoned in the 15th century AD following a malaria outbreak.

A Grecko sits on the wall.

A grecko sits on the wall.

On my return back to my appartment I was horrified to see a Praying Mantis (Mantis religiosa) on my balcony.

A Prayer Mantis on my balcony.

A Prayer Mantis on my balcony.

Fearing for my life, I had to run away! Something that I am well used to from my army days.

A close up of the Mantis.

A close up of the Mantis.

On my last day of my holiday I was going into the mountains to Saklikent Gorge. It is 50kms from Fethiye. The gorge is 20kms in length and 300 metres high.

Saklikent Gorge is over 20kms long.

Saklikent Gorge is over 20kms long.

The gorge is one of the longest in the world and I was going to walk several kilometres inland. With the water running down the gorge, the walk requires wading through the water up to waist height or in my case (as I am only 30 cms tall) being totally submerged.

A wooden walkway at the start of the gorge

A wooden walkway at the start of the gorge

A wooden walkway at the start of the gorge is the entry point into the gorge. After a few hundred metres, the walkway ends at a cafe. From here onwards, tourists must wade through the water. Safety ropes are in place for handholds. Tourists can only wade through the gorge in the summer months for safety reasons.

It is one of the longest gorges in the world.

It is one of the longest gorges in the world.

Finally, I went white water tubing down the river. After a knackering day at the gorge I headed back to the apartment where I spent my last night to a night of love with a sexy gal (I had to pay her fifty Euros). Then it was back to work the following Monday *sniffs*.

– The end –

For more information about Turkey please visit:

www.goturkey.com


My travels to Thailand 2010 – part 4

Today I was going to the eastward coastline for some scuba diving. This was to be done as a day trip from Bangkok. Around Bangkok is only a few dive sites. Today I was heading by boat to Koh Krak. It is not in the league of the dive sites in Southern Thailand such as the Similan Islands but it is convenient as a day trip from Bangkok.

The bow of the boat.

As is typical in Thailand, the sea was rough.

It was a bumpy ride to the dive site.

I planned on two dives at the island. Each diving down to approximately 12 metres.

I was glad that I was able to stay in the shade on this boat.

Getting ready for the dive.

Getting ready for the dive.

Anchoring at the dive site.

The sea was rough for diving.

After the dives, I had a wee look around the beach for the sunset before heading back to Bangkok via minibus.

My last night in Thailand before flying to Nepal.

It was a beautiful night.

Back in Bangkok I was going to enjoy my last night in town.

It is hard to escape McDonalds regardless what country one travel to.

I really like the street food in Thailand and despite what the guide books say, I never had to run for the toilet afterwards.

A typical street food stall.

Bangkok is famous for it street food.

Having a beer on my last night.

I was due to fly to Kathmandu the next day.

The Thaiair plane for Kathmandu.

I was able to get a upgrade to business class on this flight. I guess the Thaiair Stewardess like cuddly toy travellers.

Leaving Bangkok on route to Kathmandu.

I arrived in Kathmandu ready for my adventure to Mt. Everest.

For more information on my travels to Nepal please visit:

https://britisharmysgtmonkey.wordpress.com/category/travel/nepal/